New Slider For Professionals Problem gambling affects a number of professions, and Minnesota is fortunate to have skilled professionals to assist with recovery. Resources for professional

Additional information on how you can assist in recovery is available to professionals including:

Law Enforcement

A gambling disorder, when left untreated, can quickly spiral into criminal activity once legal sources of income have been exhausted. According to the Oregon Department of Health Services, two in three individuals with a gambling problem commit crimes in order to pay off debts or to continue gambling.

It is important that law enforcement and correctional systems professionals understand the nature of problem gambling and its role as a precursor to criminal activities such as:

  • Illegal drug use, possession, or trafficking
  • Domestic violence or assault
  • Theft or robbery
  • Underground betting pools and arenas

Find a counselor to work with in your area or have materials sent to you in order to better equip your staff, understand prevention methods and help start the conversation.

Human Resources

A gambling disorder can have a variety of negative impacts on the workplace, ranging from decreased employee productivity to theft, embezzlement or fraud.

To determine whether an employee is struggling with a gambling problem, consider the following warning signs:

  • Gambling longer than planned
  • Gambling until the last dollar is gone
  • Thoughts of gambling preoccupy daily life
  • Bills begin to go unpaid
  • Attempts to stop gambling are unsuccessful
  • Criminal activity to fuel gambling
  • Borrowing money from friends and family
  • Feelings of depression or suicide after losing
  • Feelings of remorse after gambling
  • Gambling to meet financial obligations

Employers and co-workers are often in the unique position to observe a gambling problem, provide intervention resources and potentially assist in the recovery process. Consider these steps to mitigate the potential impact of problem gambling on your organization:

  • Provide management training about how to identify and address a potential gambling problem
  • Provide awareness training and confidential resources for all employees
  • Develop a company gambling policy that is consistently enforced

Find a counselor to work with in your area or have materials sent to you in order to better equip your organization.

To watch a brief video on starting a conversation with an employee, click here.

Legal

Legal professionals can find themselves faced with an individual or family experiencing a financial or legal matter due to a gambling problem. Problem gambling can lead to a wide array of legal issues such as:

  • Personal bankruptcy
  • Business bankruptcy
  • Debt collections
  • Foreclosures
  • Delinquent taxes
  • Divorce
  • Child custody and support
  • Theft or embezzlement
  • Bad checks or markers
  • Charges related to drugs and alcohol (high rates of substance abuse among problem gamblers)
  • Traffic violations or warrants
  • Insurance or tax fraud

These issues can create significant pressure; yet, an individual with a gambling problem may feel that the only way out is to continue gambling. Even though many individuals who struggle with a gambling problem have no prior criminal history, they may be motivated to commit a crime out of desperation to fund their disorder or pay off gambling debts when all legitimate sources of money have been exhausted.

Find a counselor to work with in your area or have materials sent to you in order to better equip yourself and help start the conversation.

Health Care Professionals

Symptoms of a gambling disorder may not be overt; however, significant stress, clinical depression, secondhand smoke exposure and a sedentary lifestyle are often factors, in addition to co-occurring tobacco, alcohol, or chemical addictions. It is important for health care professionals to understand what questions to ask and what characteristics to look for to diagnose a gambling disorder. To help assess whether an individual may have a gambling problem, be aware of the following warning signs:

  • Gambling longer than planned
  • Gambling until the last dollar is gone
  • Thoughts of gambling preoccupy daily life
  • Bills begin to go unpaid
  • Attempts to stop gambling are unsuccessful
  • Criminal activity to fuel gambling
  • Borrowing money from friends and family
  • Feelings of depression or suicide after losing
  • Feelings of remorse after gambling
  • Gambling to meet financial obligations

If your patient may have a gambling problem, consider referring them to a qualified treatment provider, or visit our resources page to have materials sent right to you.

Gaming Management

Gaming-related establishments have an opportunity to identify issues and promote responsible gaming programs.

The Responsible Gambling Council has developed an index for gaming venues. The standards are designed to provide objective and independent benchmarks for the content, quality and breadth of “responsible gambling” programs designed and delivered by gaming companies.

Review the following key warning signs to help determine if one of your guests may have a gambling problem:

  • Gambling longer than planned
  • Gambling until the last dollar is gone
  • Thoughts of gambling preoccupy daily life
  • Bills begin to go unpaid
  • Attempts to stop gambling are unsuccessful
  • Criminal activity to fuel gambling
  • Borrowing money from friends and family
  • Feelings of depression or suicide after losing
  • Feelings of remorse after gambling
  • Gambling to meet financial obligations

For further information, find a counselor to work with in your area or request materials to have on hand to better equip both staff and patrons.

Gambling Treatment Counselors

Therapeutic counselors and treatment providers play a key role in a client’s recovery, identifying barriers and helping those in the process overcome personal obstacles.

Treatment is available and funded by the State of Minnesota for qualified individuals. The Minnesota Problem Gambling Helpline – 1-800-333-4673 (HOPE) – is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The helpline offers free, confidential assistance from counselors trained in crisis intervention. Anyone can call the helpline about their own gambling or their concern for someone else.

Other resources available to you include:

Related Minnesota gambling help:

Financial

Finance professionals can be among the first to be exposed to signs of a client’s potential gambling problem. Should an individual exhibit erratic financial behavior, understanding the signs of a gambling problem can prepare you to connect your client with the help she or he may need.

Key Warning Signs

  • Gambling longer than planned
  • Gambling until the last dollar is gone
  • Thoughts of gambling preoccupy daily life
  • Bills begin to go unpaid
  • Attempts to stop gambling are unsuccessful
  • Criminal activity to fuel gambling
  • Borrowing money from friends and family
  • Feelings of depression or suicide after losing
  • Feelings of remorse after gambling
  • Gambling to meet financial obligations

If you suspect your client may have a gambling problem, consider referring them to a qualified treatment provider or visit our resources page to have materials sent right to you.

Behavioral Health

A gambling disorder describes any form of gambling that results in functional consequences. In the DSM-V, gambling disorder is classified as a non-substance related addictive disorder; and can commonly co-occur with substance abuse, mood disorders, depression, anxiety, or other mental health disorders.

Current diagnostic criteria for gambling disorder can include persistent and recurrent problematic gambling behavior leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. Individuals exhibiting four (or more) of the following in a 12-month period would be included:

  • Needs to gamble with increasing amounts of money in order to achieve the desired excitement
  • Is restless or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop gambling
  • Has made repeated unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back, or stop gambling
  • Is often preoccupied with gambling (such as having persistent thoughts of reliving past gambling experiences, handicapping or planning the next venture, thinking of way to get money with which to gamble)
  • Often gambles when feeling distressed (helpless, guilty, anxious, depressed)
  • After losing money gambling often returns another day to get even (“chasing” one’s losses)
  • Lies to conceal the extent of involvement with gambling
  • Has jeopardized or lost a significant relationship, job or educational opportunity because of gambling
  • Relies on others to provide money to relieve a desperate financial situation caused by gambling

Find a treatment provider to work with in your area or have materials sent to you to better equip yourself and help start the conversation.